BON HOMME COUNTY

BIOGRAPHIES



BON HOMME
A. J. ABBOTT, farmer, P. O. Bon Homme was born in England in 1844, and emigrated to America in 1848. He was raised in Delavan Wisconsin, where he remained until 1867 when he came to Dakota locating in Bon Homme County. He was one of the first settlers in the county and was 140 miles from a railroad and twenty miles from Yankton, the nearest settlement. Mr. Abbott improved his place and has one of the best farms in the county, and the best buildings on his place, besides groves of timber, fruit, etc., etc. He has served as Assessor, Deputy county Clerk, Probate Judge, Sheriff, and one term in the Territorial Legislature. He has been an active man in all political matters in the county and has been successful in his business. In 1876 he was married to Miss Susan Bussey, of Dade County Wis. They have three children Thomas B., Hall W. and John A.

D. P. BRADFORD, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Bon Homme is supposed to be the oldest settler now in Dakota. He was born in Plymouth County, Mass., in 1811. When he was 17 years of age he located in Tannton, Mass. And served a three years' apprenticeship as a machinist. In 1827 he located in Rhode Island and remained until 1842, going from there to Connecticut. In 1848 he returned to Massachusetts where he remained until 1855, then went to Iowa. After remaining there one year he located at Sioux City, and in September 1857, came to Dakota, locating at Ft. Randall, where he remained until 1860 in the employ of the government; then he went to Ft. Larimer. In 1860 he moved his family to Bon Homme and was one of the first settlers there. He served in different capacities for the Government on the surveys and at the agencies until 1874, when he turned his attention to home matters. He served as Clerk of the United States District Court for several years; also served as County Commissioner when the county was organized, and was the first Justice of the Peace elected. Besides serving as Probate Judge, Justice of the Peace and Deputy Register of Deeds in 1874, in 1876 he was elected a member of the Council, and appointed Postmaster of Bon Homme, which office he filled for several years. He is now Justice of the Peace and Notary Public of Tyndall although he makes Bon Homme his home. He was married in 1832 at Warwick, R. I. To Miss Harriet Rice. They have five living children J. W., Harriet E., John, Leonora and Ella.

A. J. Cogan, sewing machine and insurance agent, was born in New Jersey in 1854. Soon after his parents came West, locating in Wisconsin and remained there about two years. From there they went to Pike Co., where they remained until 1869. His father died while in New Jersey and with his mother he came to Dakota, locating at Bon Homme, then a settlement of four houses, and but seven in the county. His mother built a hotel which they have conducted since; although Mr. Cogan has been actively engaged in other pursuits. He established the Bon Homme County Democrat in 1876 at Bon Homme. At the end of eight months he enlarged the paper and changed the name to Dakota Citizen, now published at Scotland, Dak., which he published until the fall of 1880, when he sold it and became and Deputy Register of Deeds for two years. Since then he has been engaged in the insurance and sewing machine business, besides getting out a set of abstract books of the county. While publishing the Citizen he made war on the then county's administration, and urged an investigation which revealed the fact that there was a large deficiency in the county's moneys, as produced in court by the testimony in the cases. In 1876 he was united in marriage to Miss Emma, daughter of Judge Boyle, of Iowa.

FREDERICK WELLS, P. O. Bon Homme, was born in England, in 1846. His parents emigrated to America the following year and located in Wisconsin, where he remained until 1869. He served one year in the Thirty-eighth Wisconsin Infantry, and in 1869 came West, locating in Bon Homme Co., where he secured a fine claim, as he was among the early settlers and had his choice of land. His farm contains 320 acres of choice valley land on which he has made valuable improvements and has stocked it with a fine herd of cattle. In 1871 he was elected Superintendent of Instruction and in 1875 was elected Treasurer of Bon Homme County. In October, 1874, he married Miss Sarah Abbott, of Bon Homme County. They have one son, Frederick, Jr.

SOLOMON WENZLAFF, Treasurer of Bon Homme County, was born in Russia in 1857. He emigrated to America in 1874 locating in Yankton, Dakota, where he learned the printer's trade and was employed in the office of the Dakota Free Press, and by his energy and attention to business was put in as manager. He also served as mailing clerk in the Yankton postoffice for three years, doing the work evenings. In 1880 he located at Scotland and engaged in the mercantile, notary public, real estate and insurance business, and made out all the papers for final proof for the settlers for the Yankton land office. In 1882 he was elected County Treasurer of Bon Homme County. In June 1883, Mr. Wenzlaff was married to Miss Emily S. Grant, of Bon Homme, said to be the first white child born in the county. Her father is one of the oldest newspaper men in the Territory and once Auditor of the Territory of Dakota and several times elected in Yankton for Justice of the Peace.

HON. JOSEPH ZITKA, County Clerk and Register of Deeds, was born in Bohemia, in 1850. He emigrated to America in 1867, locating in Iowa. In 1870, he came to Bon Homme County, and secured 320 acres of land by homestead and pre-emption. At that time there were but few people in the county, and but two houses from Bon Homme to Yankton; St. James, Nebraska, forty miles distant, contained the nearest mill. Mr. Zitka has his place well improved for the length of time he has been here. In 1872 he was elected County Commissioner for a term of two years, and was re-elected. In 1874 he was elected a member of the Dakota Legislature; in 1882 was elected County Clerk and Register of Deeds of Bon Homme County. In 1876 he was married at Crete, Nebraska, to Miss Mary Bohac. They have three children Hattie, Rose and Mary.

C. T. McCOY, REGISTER UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.

SPRINGFIELD
M. H. DAY, attorney and dealer in real estate, was born in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, in 1844, where he passed his early years. He enlisted in 1861, in Company I, Eleventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, serving four years. He received a severe wound at the battle of Port Gibson. After his discharge from the army he located in Humboldt County, Iowa, where he engaged in mercantile business until 1873, when he came to Dakota. He remained three years in Brule. Was elected County Clerk and Register of Deeds of Brule County, and served three years. The nearest railroad point at the time of his settlement was 150 miles off, and there were but five settlers in the county. He shipped in a stock of goods and established the first trading point in the county; his principal trade being with the Indians. In 1876 he located at Springfield, Dak., and was engaged in the mercantile business until 1879. During 1876-77, he was one of the first white men to go to the Black Hills, where he became interested in several mines in Strawberry Gulch. He then returned to Springfield, and engaged in the law and real estate business. In 1878 he was elected a member of the Upper House of Dakota Legislature for his district, and re-elected in 1880. He was married in 1867 to Miss M. E. Southwick of Humboldt, Iowa. They have three children - Julia, M. L., and Bessie.

GEORGE W. SNOW, banker, Springfield, was born in Indiana, in 1812. When two years of age his parents settled in Grant County, Wis., where he remained until 1862, when he enlisted in the Twentieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and served three years. In 1869 he came to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County, where he took a homestead. There was but one family in Springfield, who occupied a dug-out on the town site. Sioux City was then the nearest railroad point, some ninety-five miles distant, while Yankton was the only trading post. In 1870 Mr. Snow built a saw-mill, which he ran until 1876, this being the first saw mill west of Yankton. He then undertook to move the mill to the Black Hills, but owing to the heavy fall of snow was obliged to abandon the task. In 1878 he was elected County Treasurer, and held the office two terms. He then engaged in the real estate business at Springfield, in which he has since been engaged. In June 1883, he established the Bank of Springfield, the second bank in the county, and is doing a general banking business in connection with real estate, which he carries on on an extensive scale, the records showing his sales to be about four times as large as any other in the county. Mr. Snow is one of the live, energetic men of his town, and takes an active interest in all public matters. In 1874 he was married to Miss Sylvia Tyler, of Yankton. At the end of four years, his wife died, and in 1882 he was married again to Mrs. A. M. Davison, of Belle Creek, Nebraska.

J. H. STEPHENS, dealer in furniture and harness, was born in Jo Daviess County, Ills., in 1850. He lived there and in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, where he learned the harness maker's trade, after which he spent a short time in Chicago, and in 1872 came to Dakota, locating in Yankton, before that place was anything but a small settlement. At the end of one year he settled in Springfield, where he located a claim of 180 acres of land to which he has added more, making 620 acres in all. This is located in Emanuel Creek and is a choice stock farm, which he has rendered more valuable by planting timber, putting land in cultivation and various other improvements. Mr. Stephens also put in the first stock of harness and furniture in Bon Homme County, which business he has carried on successfully since he has been here. In 1878-79 he was elected Representative from his district to the Territorial Legislature, comprising the counties of Hutchinson, Davison, Bon Homme and Charles Mix. Mr. Stephens is one of the leading Republicans of his county, and a live business man. He was married in August, 1874, to Miss E. A. Place, of Yankton, Dak. They have three children Fannie, Harry and Everett.

TYNDALL

D. W. CURRIER, dealer in real estate, and proprietor of Tyndall town site, settled in Dakota in May, 1874, locating at Springfield, Bon Homme County, where he engaged in the mercantile business. In 1878 he bought land in Sections 35, 26 and 34, Town 95, Range 60, and laid out a town; but the railroad was built soon after and he bought land and laid out the town of Tyndall, consisting of 200 acres; he also put up some buildings, and at once became a prime worker in building up the town, having built twelve buildings, among which is a fine hotel, 80x100 feet, two stories high, which is a credit to the place and himself, and is one of the best houses in southern Dakota. Mr. Currier is the most extensive real estate owner in the county, and has a farm of 1,040 acres, besides other lands in the county amounting to 2,400 acres. He has served one term as County Commissioner. He was married in 1850 to Miss Workman, of Ogle County, Ill. They have two children Ida L., and Edith W.

L. A. HAIGHT, proprietor of hotel and meat market, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1847 but was raised in Greene County, living there until 1876, when he emigrated to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County, where he took a homestead nine miles from Bon Homme, and remained almost five years. Yankton, thirty miles distant, was the nearest railroad point, and his nearest neighbor was ten miles away. In the fall of 1882 he located at Tyndall and opened the first meat market in the place. In the spring of 1883 he opened the Dakota House, a neat little house, with good accommodations. Mr. Haight and his wife spare no pains to make their guests feel at home. In 1865 he was married at Greenville, Greene Co., N. Y., to Miss Annie E. Showers.

F. RICHMOND, farmer, P. O. Tyndall, was born in 1842, on Pugets Sound, the first white male child born north of the Columbia River, west of the Rocky Mountains, his father, John P. Richmond, being a missionary in the Northwest for three and a half years. Returning to Ogle County, Ill., the subject of this sketch was raised there and when the Rebellion broke out, entered the army in 1863, and served until September, 1865. He then went to Missouri and remained there six years, and went from there to Illinois, where he engaged in teaching. In 1872 he came to Dakota and was a resident of Clay County one year, where he engaged in teaching. In 1873 he located in Bon Homme County, on the first claim near the present town of Tyndall. Yankton was then the nearest town, thirty miles distant. Mr. Richmond turned his attention to the improvement of his place and now has one of the best farms in this section of the county. In 1877 he was elected County Superintendent of Schools and has served two terms. He was married in 1865 to Miss Lovina Mallery, of Humboldt, Mo. They have four children Clarence, J. W., Mary F. and Frank.

GEORGE T. ROUNDS, Postmaster and liveryman, was born in Bradford Co., Penn., in 1850. In 1854 his parents moved to Minnesota, where they remained until the fall of 1859, and then came to Bon Homme County. There were but few settlers and ten or twelve people would comprise the whole settlement of the county. The nearest railroad was several hundred miles distant. Sioux City was the nearest postoffice, some eighty-five miles distant, and all supplies were brought from that point. For a year or two the Indians caused some trouble, and some of the settlers were killed. In 1880, Mr. Rounds located at Tyndall, and opened the first livery stable in the place; there were but three buildings in the place. In August, 1883, he was appointed Postmaster of Tyndall. He served one term as County Clerk and Register of Deeds, and has served several years as Deputy Sheriff. In 1881 he was married to Miss America Richmond, of Tyndall. They have one son Richmond N.

A. ZIENERT, merchant, was born in Austria, in 1849, and emigrated to America in 1868, locating at Portage City, Wis. In 1871 he went to Sioux City, Iowa, where he remained until 1874, coming from there to Yankton, Dak., but soon after removed to Bon Homme and located a timber claim and homestead. Here he opened a general store and built up a large trade. When the railroad was built through the country, he located at Tyndall, and bought 160 acres of land, and platted 50 acres which he called North Tyndall. He also put up a general store in a building which he erected, 64X94 feet, and his business having increased fifty percent. Mr. Zienert has worked up his business by his own tact, and although he started with a very small capital, he now controls a vast amount of property, and is certainly one of the most enterprising men in Dakota. In 1875 he was married to Miss Susan Schliessman, of Portage City, Wis.

D. P. BRADFORD, LAND AND LOAN AGENT

SCOTLAND
M. M. BOYLES, blacksmith, was born in DuBois County, Ind., in 1847, where he remained until seventeen years of age. He then removed to Illinois and remained there eleven years, coming from there to Dakota in 1875, and located in Olivet, Hutchinson County, being among the pioneers of that county. Mr. Boyles secured a homestead near Olivet and soon after built a hotel at that point, of which he was proprietor for several years. In 1880, when the railroad was built at Scotland, he located at that point and built the first blacksmith shop there, which he owned and used for his business until November, 1883, which he sold, and bought a farm of 160 acres one mile from Olivet, where he now resides, and runs a shop and his farm. In 1874 he was united in marriage to Miss Elma J. Branch, of Illinois. They have two children Grace and Warren.

ALFRED BROWN, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born near Montreal, Canada, in 1836. He was raised on a farm, and followed that business until 1873, when he emigrated to the States, and soon after located in Hutchinson County, Dak. Here he secured a large tract of land by homestead, pre-emption and timber claims. He was among the very first settlers in the county, there being no improvements, and no town nearer than Yankton, thirty miles distant. Mr. Brown has a desirable place two miles from Scotland and well improved; has a fine house, barns, timber, orchard, wind mill, and 100 acres in pasture, 100 acres plow land, and thirty-five acres timber, and stocked with a large herd of cattle, sheep and horses. He was married in 1857 to Miss Sara J. Grant, of Canada. They have eight children William, Aleck, James, Margaret E., Wellington, Wesley, Henry and Hampton.

JOHN BROWN, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1841, where he lived until 1873, when he came to Dakota. He and his brothers were among the early settlers in Bon Homme County. The nearest railroad point was Yankton, thirty miles distant, and all timber and supplies were drawn from there. Mr. Brown secured two claims of 320 acres, which he has in a high state of cultivation, sixty-five acres under the plow, twenty acres of fine timber, good buildings, etc., and has been very successful. He was married in 1869 to Miss Sarah J. Hubbard, of Canada. They have six children James A., George E., Margaret V., John T., Alice M., and Winnie M.

THOMAS A. BURTSCH, proprietor of meat market, was born in Ontario, Canada in 1849; was raised there and in Canada West until 1858. He then moved to Michigan, located in Port Hope, and in 1873 came to Hutchinson County, Dak., where he located a claim. He was among the first settlers, and put up the first house north of Scotland. The nearest railroad point was Yankton, thirty miles distant, and that was the only point where supplies could be obtained. After remaining on his claim six years and improving it, he located in Scotland, where he opened the first harness shop in the place, after which he engaged in the sale of farm machinery. At the end of two years he sold out and opened a large meat market, which he has carried on since. Mr. Burtsch is one of the most enterprising business men in the place, and has built up a large trade by close attention to business and the excellent quality of his goods. In 1874 he was married to Miss Susan Grant of Scotland. They have two sons Fayette W., and Albert A.

THOMAS CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Hoiton, Canada, in 1837, where he lived until 1878, when he came to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County, and secured 320 acres of land near Scotland by pre- emption and timber claims. He has seventy-five acres in cultivation, and seven acres of timber planted, besides other improvements. For some time he has been engaged in stock raising. Mr. Campbell has served two years as Deputy Chief Marshal of Scotland. In 1867 he was married to Miss Mary H. Walters. They have seven children Albert C., Minnie, George, William, Victoria, John and Maud.

MAJOR ROBERT DOLLARD, attorney at law, one of the pioneers of Douglas County, was born at Fall River, Mass., in 1842, and made that State his home until the war broke out in 1861, when he enlisted in the Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. At the end of three months he was mustered out, and again enlisted, and was rapidly promoted to lieutenant and then to captain, for bravery and efficiency in handling his men. He soon after was given a major's commission and the command of a regiment, with a letter of thanks from his commanding general. After coming out of the army he was in various places until 1879, when he came to Dakota, and was the second settler in Douglas County. He remained in the county on his claim until the fall of 1880, when he located in Scotland, and returned to the practice of law. There was some crooked work in organizing the county, which Mr. Dollard brought to light. Mr. Dollard is a thorough going man, who has no one to thank but himself for his success in life. In 1875, at Yates City, Ill., he was married to Carrie E. Dunn of that place.

ALEX. GIBBON, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Canada in 1835. When 20 years of age he came to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County and soon after took a homestead and timber claim. He was one of the pioneers of the county, Yankton being the nearest town where goods could be purchased. There were no improvements, and not a house in sight. Mr. Gibbon has a choice farm near the thriving city of Scotland which is fast improving in value. He has seventy acres in cultivation, sixteen acres of timber planted, and other improvements and although times were hard for a few years, has done well since his settlement.

ALEX. GRANT, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Ireland in 1816. The next year his parents emigrated to America. He was raised there, remaining until 1871, when he emigrated to Minnesota. In 1873 he came to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County. Mr. Grant was one of the first settlers on Dawson Creek where he secured 320 acres of choice land. It was twenty-five miles from a railroad point and there were no improvements. When Scotland was platted it took forty acres of his land in the corporation and he at once platted Grant's addition, consisting of twelve acres, and has disposed of a good many lots. He has a few more, very desirable for resident lots, which he will dispose of at reasonable figures. Mr. Grant has made some extensive improvements on his farm, among which is a grove which is a credit to any farm. He was married in 1838, and has seven children Sarah Jane, Harriet, William, Wellington, Mary, Ann and Susan.

HUGH M. GUNN, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Scotland in 1833. When 20 years of age he emigrated to Canada where he remained until 1860, going from Canada to Colorado; remained two years, thence to Arizona, British Columbia and other western points, until 1876, when he settled in Dakota, being among the pioneers of Bon Homme County. His wife came to the Territory while Mr. Gunn was in the West. At that time Sioux City was the nearest railroad point and Yankton the nearest postoffice. Mr. Gunn was married to Miss Catharine McKay, of Canada, in 1858. They have three children Hugh H., Alexander W. and John G.

JOSEPH McINTOSH, farmer, P. O. Scotland, one of the pioneers of Dakota, was born in Scotland in 1829. When 23 years of age he emigrated to America, locating in New York, going from there to Chicago, where he remained a short time. He then went to Canada and remained there about seventeen years. In 1859 he removed to Iowa, locating in Sioux City, and the following year settled in Bon Homme County where he secured 320 acres of choice land near the present town of Scotland. Sioux City was then the nearest railroad point, while Yankton, twenty-three miles distant, was the nearest postoffice. For the first two or three years dry weather and grasshoppers made life in his new home a burden, but after these first few years he succeeded in making a fine stock farm of his place. He now has 110 acres in cultivation, a fine lot of stock, with plenty of water and good facilities for marketing his produce. In 1854 he was married to Miss Ann Murray, of Canada. They have eight children Hugh Joseph, John Alexander, Robert Murray, Marion Isabelle, Annie, Christina, George and Donald.

ALEX. McINTYRE, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1829. When 19 years of age he came to America, locating in Canada where he remained until 1871. He then went to North Carolina where he engaged in farming for five years, and in 1876 settled in Dakota where he secured 320 acres of land, by using his homestead and timber culture rights, four and a half miles west of Scotland and in Bon Homme County, where he continued to live and improve his farm until the time of his death in 1884. He was one of the pioneer settlers, as there was no settlement west of where he was located at that time. He was married in 1851 to Miss Mary J. Morden, of Ontario, Canada. They had nine children George H., Rebecca, Alex. W., Sarah M., William A., Joseph C., Nancy E., Samuel P. and James F.

MRS. JULIA McNICOL was born in County of Lanark, Canada, where she was raised. She was married in 1856 to Duncan McNicol. They came to Dakota in 1870 where a few of their people had preceded them, and located claims in Bon Homme County. They were among the first settlers and there was nothing in the shape of improvements yet to be seen. Yankton, twenty-five miles distant, was the nearest point, and there they went for all supplies. To add to this misfortune, Mr. McNicol died at the end of six months, leaving Mrs. McNicol with a large family of small children to fight the battle of a pioneer life alone. This she nobly did, and not only saved the home they had taken but added to it with the help of her children. She planted a large grove of timber and broke seventy acres of land, built a fine house and made many other improvements, and is among the thrifty farmers of Bon Homme County. There are eight children John, Julia, James, Mary, Flora, Jane, Isabelle and Ellen.

EDEN MAXWELL, real estate dealer was born in Montreal, Canada, May 14, 1849. In 1869 he emigrated to Dakota, with his father and brothers. They were the first settlers on the Jim River in Hutchinson County. He located _______d in the Jim River Valley, ninety miles from Sioux City, the nearest railroad point. In 1874, in company with his brother and other parties, he built a grist mill, which was the first mill erected west of Yankton on the river. In 1872, when the county was organized, he was elected County Clerk and Register of Deeds, holding these offices three terms. In 1879, when the town of Scotland was laid out he located at that point and engaged in the real estate business, and soon after became agent of the Manitoba Loan Company, controlled by English capitalists, and has done a large business in real estate, loans, etc. Mr. Maxwell is one of the most enterprising business men in the county and is identified with all public matters tending toward the growth and development of the country.

E. D. MORGAN, M. D., was born at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1846. When fifteen years of age he went to Covington, Kentucky, remaining there until 1878. In 1861 he enlisted in the Second United States Regulars and served four years and three months. After coming out of the army he accepted a position as a travelling salesman for a drug house in Covington, where he remained nearly two years and during this time devoted all his spare time to reading medicine. He then took a course at the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, graduating in 1871, and then practiced medicine in Lexington, his native place. In 1878, he located in Butler County, Nebraska, where he built up a large practice. In September, 1881, he came to Scotland, and in a short time had the best practice in the county. In July 1882, he was appointed surgeon of the Running Water branch of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. In the fall of 1883 he was appointed professor of Chemistry and Therapeutics for the University of Nebraska. He was married in 1867 to Miss Hattie Crooks, of Harrison County, Virginia. In 1872 Mrs. Morgan was drowned, and he was again married in 1878 to Miss Emogene Eaton, of Nebraska.

E. S. MOSHER, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Saratoga Co., N. Y., in 1815. When about nine years of age he removed to Jefferson County with his parents, where he remained until 1849. He moved from there to Winnebago County, Wisconsin, and remained twenty years, working at house building most of the time. In 1869 he came to Yankton, Dakota, being one of her early settlers. Sioux City was then the nearest railroad point and it was about forty miles to the nearest mill, somewhere in northern Nebraska. When he put up his first house he paid $80 per thousand for flooring drawing the same from Nebraska. Mr. Mosher secured a homestead and was engaged in farming about ten years. He was also appointed Postmaster at an early day of the first office north and west of Yankton on the Jim River. In 1879 his wife died. He then located in Bon Homme County. He was married in 1883 to Miss Christina Hicks, of Jefferson County, New York. He has five children Simeon F., Patience E., Mary M., Anetta and Eliza.

A. E. PARMETER, of Maxwell & Parmeter, flouring mills, was born in Erie County, New York, in 1849, and was raised and lived there until 1874, following the occupation of milling. He came from there to Dakota, locating in Hutchinson County and became identified with the Maxwell Brothers in a mill on the Jim River. This was the first mill on the river above Yankton. In 1883 business had grown so much they were obliged to erect a new mill, the building to have all modern improvements with a capacity of 100 barrels per day, and will use this for merchant milling while the old mill will do custom work. The size of the mill is 36 by 60 feet and has a patent roller process and is among the best equipped in the Territory. Mr. Parmeter and his partners are among the most enterprising men in southern Dakota and their improvements have been very valuable to this part of Dakota. In 1878 he was married to Miss Annie C. Maxwell. They have one son John C.

J. R. PETRIE, Deputy United States Marshal, was born at Mount Morris, Ogle Co., Ill., in 1841, and was the first white child born in the county. He served three and one-half years in Company A, Second Illinois Cavalry, during the Rebellion, and rose from the ranks to Second Lieutenant of Company I. After coming out of the army he served as Sheriff and Deputy Sheriff for several years, and also served one term as Deputy United States Marshal. In January, 1873, he came to Dakota, and located in Bon Homme County, one of the pioneers of the county, and located a farm near Springfield. Sioux City, 100 miles distant, was then the nearest railroad point. At the end of five years he was elected Sheriff of Bon Homme County, after which he was appointed Deputy United States Marshal, and has held the office continuously since. He was also serving as Deputy Sheriff. In the fall of 1882 he located in Scotland and soon after was elected City Marshal. Mr. Petrie is known as one of the most vigilant and efficient officers in the Territory, and is a terror to evil-doers. In 1865 he married Miss Arrilla M. Ford, of Ogle County, Illinois. They have three children Alice, George F., and Mildred.

ELIAS SHUPE, farmer, P. O. Scotland, one of the pioneers of Bon Homme County, was born in Canada, in 1842, where he was raised and lived until 1874. He then emigrated to Dakota, locating in Bon Homme County, and secured a homestead of 160 acres and a timber claim of eighty acres, close to the town site of Scotland. He has a valuable farm which, with the improvements made, is fast becoming one of the most desirable in the county. Mr. Shupe is a pleasant, courteous gentleman and one of the popular men of the town. In 1866 he was married to Miss May Atkinson, of Canada. They have four children Hannah A., John E., Roxy A. and Emily E.

GEORGE STAFFORD, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Canada, in 1843. On coming to Dakota, he located in Bon Homme County, being among the first settlers. The nearest railroad was some seventy-five miles distant and there were but few inhabitants outside of sod houses. Mr. Stafford secured 320 acres of land by homestead and pre-emption, and at once began to convert the wild land into a farm. The first few years were very discouraging, owing to grasshoppers and drought, but by perseverance and pluck he finally came out ahead. He has a fine lot of young timber growing, a good share of his place in cultivation, and has done remarkably well in business. In 1870 he was married to Miss Mary Stafford, of Canada. They have two children John and Flossie.

JOHN STAFFORD, Postmaster, was born near St. Catherines, Ont., in 1810, and lived there for sixty-three years engaged in mercantile business and other pursuits. In 1872 he came to the Territory of Dakota, bringing a stock of goods with him. He located 160 acres of land in Bon Homme County. The country was very new and it was seventy-four miles to a railroad point. Mr. Stafford put up a small building and opened the first stock of goods for sale in this part of the county. He soon after was appointed Postmaster, and managed to do quite a business in selling goods, farming, etc. In 1879, the railroad was built through the county and Mr. Stafford donated ninety acres to the Railroad Company to build a town, which has been named Scotland. He has since platted several additions to the town and has been one of the leading men in building it up. He has been liberal to those who come to the place to settle, and has donated several tracts of land to different enterprises which would benefit the place. He has also made many improvements in the town and on his land which add to their beauty. In 1839, he was married to Miss Rebecca Shoope, of Youngstown, N. Y., and has raised seven children Adam, George, Abel, John, Mary, Emily and Rebecca.

J. V. TEIBEL, one of the pioneers of Dakota, was born in Bohemia in 1856, and emigrated to America in 1867, locating in Wisconsin, where he remained several years attending and teaching school, coming from there to Yankton, Dak., about 1871 with his father. They were about the first Bohemian settlers in the Territory. Here Mr. Teibel was employed by the Indian traders and soon learned the Indian dialect. Then for a time was with his father engaged in farming, and in 1878, became a resident of Bon Homme County, where he secured 320 acres of land in homestead and timber claims. He spent three years improving his farm and at the same time located over 100 families of his countrymen on Dakota farms. When the town of Scotland was started he became a resident of the young and thriving town, and for several years was engaged in handling farm machinery. He has held several important positions, serving one year as City Marshal. In 1878, he was married to Miss Mary Uyborny, of Tabor, Bon Homme County. They have four children Lillian, Joseph, Lucy and Kate.

H. M. TRUESDELL was born at Rockford, Ill., in 1848, where he remained until of age. He then went to Durand, Ill., and engaged in the manufacture of wagons and carriages, and from there to Wisconsin, and kept hotel for several years, after which he was in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad as superintendent of painting. In the spring of 1883, he located at Scotland, where he opened a first- class sample room and has made a host of friends by his pleasant and courteous treatment of all he comes in contact with, while his place is stocked with the choicest wines and liquors and the best of imported and domestic cigars. All who call on him can rest assured that they will receive the best and meet with a pleasant reception by the genial proprietor. He spares no cost or pains to make it pleasant forhis guests, while the place is quiet and homelike. In 1869, he was married to Miss Helen L. Genong, of Durand, Ill. They have three children Myron A., Edith May and Henry W.

WILLIAM WALTERS, farmer, P. O. Scotland, was born in Nova Scotia in 1837. When six years of age he located in Upper Canada, where he remained until 1873, then emigrated to Dakota, locating near Scotland on one of the first claims in Bon Homme County. Yankton was then the nearest and only point where supplies could be obtained. After remaining on his place a few years he located at Milltown, in Hutchinson Cunty, where he engaged in farming and hotel keeping. In 1872, he was married to Mrs. Sophia Collins, who located a claim which her former husband had taken but did not live to prove upon. His widow then made a homestead of the place; but several parties were determined to have the claim, and it was with great difficulty she managed to hold it until she secured a patent. Her children now occupy the place, three daughters Clara, Emma and Ella. Mr. Walters has three children by a former wife George, Irving and Arthur.

JAMES BROWN, MERCHANT.

ELLIOT THYNNE, TEACHER.